ROTATE RESONATE

© 1989

64 inches wide x 76 inches high x 25 inches deep

Rod Length 31 inches

Currently in the collection of the Artist

"..Rotate Resonate, a sunburst of randomly placed wires poking out from an axle attached to a pair of vibrating typewriter motors.  As the motors vibrate, the sunburst follows suit, occasionally shaking and sometimes spinning to create a little light show at the end of the axle."  - Pat Craig, The Contra Costa Times.

 

*****
       
"Don't ask me how it works, but when you push a button on a wooden box, various numbers start flashing rapidly on a digital readout display while a rimless wheel with six flexible metal spokes rotates above a round hole in the center of the box, which emits a sound resembling a sustained low note played on a cello."
       - Tom Patterson, The Winston-Salem Journal, 1/18/92, pg. C3

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Rotate Resonate Video, 56 seconds

Rotate Resonate

Norman Tuck ©1989

 64 inches wide x 76 inches high x 25 inches deep

Rod Length 31 inches

Dimension of lower chamber = 25 inches x 15 inches x 10 inches high.

 

Suggested Pedestal Size: Low Traffic Exhibition: 25” x 35” x 10”

       Dimension of Shipping Crate: 40” x 12” x 18” 80 pounds

 

Description

Rotate Resonate focuses on a set of six fine metal rods that radiate from from a brass axle mounted between two electronic stepper motors. Two tall copper columns support the motors and rods, which tower over a colony of electronic components mounted on a copper clad circuit board.

The rods spin, shake, vibrate and resonate with a surprising symphony of visual and acoustic patterns as the motors alter tempo over time. The circuit board tops a wooden sound chamber that amplifies the musical vibration of the rods as they resonate.

 

Wall Text

ROTATE / RESONATE

Watch the odd motion of the stainless steel rods.  Listen for sounds that come from the wooden base.

In Rotate/Resonate stepper motors cause the central axle to turn and vibrate the wire spokes.  The piece speeds up, slows down and reverses randomly as it passes through various resonant frequencies.  The balance of the wire rod assembly changes; sometimes it pulls the axle to the left and at other times to the right.

 

Just as the wooden slats in Wave Generator have natural resonant frequencies, so these stainless steel rods also pass through their resonant frequencies.  The wooden box at the base of the sculpture amplifies the sounds like the body of an acoustic guitar.

The rods produce visual patterns and light plays off the reflective rods.

 

Quotes

"... a rimless wheel with six flexible metal spokes ... emits a sound resembling a sustained low note played on a cello." Tom Patterson, The Winston-Salem Journal.

           

"..Rotate Resonate, a sunburst of randomly placed wires poking out from an axle attached to a pair of vibrating typewriter motors.  As the motors vibrate, the sunburst follows suit, occasionally shaking and sometimes spinning to create a little light show at the end of the axle." Pat Craig, The Contra Costa Times.

 

"Don't ask me how it works, but when you push a button on a wooden box, various numbers start flashing rapidly on a digital readout display while a rimless wheel with six flexible metal spokes rotates above a round hole in the center of the box, which emits a sound resembling a sustained low note played on a cello." Tom Patterson, The Winston-Salem Journal.

 

Exhibition Requirements:

In a high traffic environment (science museum) the public should not be allowed to grab the rods on Rotate Resonate. Included is a remote panel with a button that triggers the piece to piece to work for a timed period so the piece will need to run needlessly when no one is watching it. The remote panel is connected to the piece via a cable.

It will be necessary to keep people from grabbing the spinning rods. You can either mount the piece on a small pedestal (25 inches x 35 inches x 8 inch high) and somehow keep the public at a distance with ropes or something on the floor, or you can build a very large stand for the piece that will prevent the public from getting too close.

Electrical Requirement – 1 Amp @ 120 Volts.

N.T. 2015